Good Leaders: How did you discover your purpose?

speaker-featured-2017-richard-leider-sold-outAspiring young athletes go to professional sporting events and breathe the same air as their heroes. Once they become superstars, they always tell interviewers, “I wanted to be just like [fusion_builder_container hundred_percent=”yes” overflow=”visible”][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”no” center_content=”no” min_height=”none”][ Name That Player ] when I was growing up.”  That’s how I feel about spending time with Richard Leider, the world’s most recognized authority on the power of purpose. He is the author, speaker and executive coach whom I admire the most.

I’m writing about Richard because he’s one of my mentors, and he is the speaker for the Good Leadership Breakfast next Friday. He changed the trajectory of my coaching, writing and speaking when he asked me the question: Is your purpose always in your message?

The power of purpose

Richard’s gift is making deep and powerful concepts simple in the lives of leaders. And it’s totally obvious that his “purpose” is cultivating the power of purpose in others. He is widely recognized as one of America’s preeminent executive-life coaches. In a career spanning five decades, he has helped more than 100,000 leaders from over 100 organizations discover the power of their leadership purpose.

This beautiful tree image is the symbolism that frames Richard Leider's message. Find it at RichardLeider.com

This beautiful tree image is the symbolism that frames Richard Leider’s message. Find it at RichardLeider.com

Richard is the author of ten books which have sold more than one million copies in 20 languages. My favorites: The Power of Purpose, Repacking Your Bags, Whistle While You Work, and Something to Live For. It’s easy to see why his work has a universal appeal and impact. The subjects are simple, the writing is poetic and the wisdom is timeless.

We expect a sold out event on February 10 as Richard Leider helps us explore the power of our purpose in leadership.

We expect a sold out event on February 10 as Richard Leider helps us explore the power of our purpose in leadership.

“I’m excited to share my insights about The Seven Fs, because I think people will resonate with the idea that our purpose in life is at the center of our satisfaction with faith, family, finances, fitness, friends, fun and future,” he explains. “And when we really understand good leadership, each of us will be able to answer these three purposeful leadership questions: 1) What do I stand for? 2) What won’t I stand for? and 3) Who will I stand with?”

Share your thoughts

Single tickets for the February 10 breakfast are sold out. There are still some series tickets available, which provide attendance to Richard Leider. If you aren’t able to join us, I will recap his presence with us two weeks from today. And we will have a short summary video.

Good leaders create endless possibilities when they understand their purpose. And they create great results when they choose the right people to stand with on the journey.

If you share your thoughts with me, I will pass them along to Richard: How did you discover your purpose? Comment below or email me directly.

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6 Comments

  1. John Gamades on January 31, 2017 at 10:26 am

    I think one of the most interesting things that came from this question was the realization that for me, the moments when my purpose became the clearest were on the backside of significant trials. My professional purpose became crystal clear in the midst of a corporate layoff, and my personal purpose as a father and husband showed itself on the back end of a divorce. In both instances, the trials were the catalyst for positive change and new directions. Today I look to the trials with great appreciation and gratitude.



  2. John Gamades on January 31, 2017 at 10:26 am

    I think one of the most interesting things that came from this question was the realization that for me, the moments when my purpose became the clearest were on the backside of significant trials. My professional purpose became crystal clear in the midst of a corporate layoff, and my personal purpose as a father and husband showed itself on the back end of a divorce. In both instances, the trials were the catalyst for positive change and new directions. Today I look to the trials with great appreciation and gratitude.



  3. Thomas "Teej" Thaldorf on February 13, 2017 at 1:52 pm

    If recollection serves, my purpose was discovered through deliberate trial and error. Further, others might reflect a similar history in which past leaders of honorable mention didn’t create solid foundations as a matter of experience. These role models professed an opinion that foundational elements like financial security, stability and related concepts were generally illusions. In other words, those leaders who impacted results and created possibilities literally didn’t stand around at all. They didn’t create rooted foundations, but skipped from foothold to foothold knowing that complacency eventually would erode the very platform on which they were standing. The reason I admire good leadership tenants and those who are trying these perspectives on for size is that they are arguably more than just homes to live in. More so one might suggests these leadership perspectives are best leveraged as wearable lenses to avoid or minimize footholds of injury. Many might agree that movement in this life seems to be required to flourish. Nevertheless, the type of movement is key. Steps of faith, energy and purpose for example create attractive footwork which, repeated, create lift, momentum and speed to navigate daily change and contribute to more vibrate business and life experience. More? Perhaps one could use comedy as an example. Is there laughter without tension and perhaps even pain? The trick here is to wade into the challenges of life fully, embrace those diamonds of brilliance and progress and then emerge laughing just before the moment of drowning. Morbid? Perhaps… but if it speaks truthfully to others life experience? Then I stand morbidly with company! Thanks for the ongoing exchange and discussion!



  4. Thomas "Teej" Thaldorf on February 13, 2017 at 1:52 pm

    If recollection serves, my purpose was discovered through deliberate trial and error. Further, others might reflect a similar history in which past leaders of honorable mention didn’t create solid foundations as a matter of experience. These role models professed an opinion that foundational elements like financial security, stability and related concepts were generally illusions. In other words, those leaders who impacted results and created possibilities literally didn’t stand around at all. They didn’t create rooted foundations, but skipped from foothold to foothold knowing that complacency eventually would erode the very platform on which they were standing. The reason I admire good leadership tenants and those who are trying these perspectives on for size is that they are arguably more than just homes to live in. More so one might suggests these leadership perspectives are best leveraged as wearable lenses to avoid or minimize footholds of injury. Many might agree that movement in this life seems to be required to flourish. Nevertheless, the type of movement is key. Steps of faith, energy and purpose for example create attractive footwork which, repeated, create lift, momentum and speed to navigate daily change and contribute to more vibrate business and life experience. More? Perhaps one could use comedy as an example. Is there laughter without tension and perhaps even pain? The trick here is to wade into the challenges of life fully, embrace those diamonds of brilliance and progress and then emerge laughing just before the moment of drowning. Morbid? Perhaps… but if it speaks truthfully to others life experience? Then I stand morbidly with company! Thanks for the ongoing exchange and discussion!



  5. Thomas "Teej" Thaldorf on February 13, 2017 at 1:56 pm

    John… couldn’t agree more. Contrast, challenge… these are moments (perhaps even tools) that trigger drama required for adaptation as well as conditions favorable for new seeds of brilliance to pop up and flourish where nothing had been growing before.



  6. Thomas "Teej" Thaldorf on February 13, 2017 at 1:56 pm

    John… couldn’t agree more. Contrast, challenge… these are moments (perhaps even tools) that trigger drama required for adaptation as well as conditions favorable for new seeds of brilliance to pop up and flourish where nothing had been growing before.



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