What causes you to think about CaringBridge?

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Who knew popcorn would cause me to think of Caring Bridge?

Don’t you just love popcorn? It’s one of the food groups I simply can’t resist. But what if it made you sick?  Really sick?

I dread the situations that cause me to think about CaringBridge…you know, the web site which connects people who are seriously ill with prayer-givers sending their healing wishes?  Last Monday, I woke early to get my work done so I could attend the Minnesota State High School Soccer Tournament at the Metrodome.  On my way to my seat, I bought a box of popcorn for dinner. Innocent enough…it’s one of my happy routines.  Half way through the box I noticed my tongue swelling.  Serious allergic reaction.  By the time I got to Urgent Care my tongue had swelled so much I couldn’t talk or breathe through my mouth. Bummer.

You know that song by Matt Kearney: Closer to Love…it has that one line: I guess we’re all one phone call from our knees. For about two minutes, I wondered if they were going to have to make that phone call to Melinda and my kids. The look in the nurse’s eye told me this could be a “serious bummer.”  She jammed an Epi Pen into my arm and Benadryl into my butt cheek. Within minutes my tongue began to shrink, but the drugs knocked me silly.  While prancing through cotton candy, thoughts of CaringBridge floated across my mushy brain.  “Funny…the founder and creator of CaringBridge is the speaker at my breakfast series next Friday,” I thought.

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Sona Mehring, is CEO and Founder of Caring Bridge.

Sona Mehring is one of the coolest people I’ve met along the goodness journey.  She’s the founder and creator of CaringBridge.  Her story is compelling…and the CaringBridge mission far exceeds my popcorn incident. Melinda and I have walked the journey of friends and loved ones with CaringBridge as our life line. How about you? The web site has made it easy and socially acceptable to eavesdrop on those who really need our prayers.

The Good Leadership Breakfast this Friday is the last of our Fall series. We’re so excited to have Sona Mehring as our speaker that we are willing to overlook the fact she and her sons are Packers fans.

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Sona is the female surrounded by her Packer-fan sons.

I hope we can all listen unfiltered to her courageous, inspiring, entrepreneurial tale. As grown-ups, our life experiences often cause us to limit our possibilities with artificial constraints. With a simple act of helping a friend, Sona launched one of the most inspiring social-entrepreneurial ventures in our lifetime.  It’s a Thanksgiving story worth hearing early.

Good leaders find the silver lining in scary, life-threatening experiences. And every once in awhile they act on an idea that changes how society works.

Please consider joining me for breakfast this Friday, when Sona Mehring — the founder of CaringBridge — is our speaker.  Register here. Don’t worry, we won’t be serving popcorn.

Please take moment to share with me your most touching CaringBridge moment…I’ll pass it along to Sona on Friday.[/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

12 Comments

  1. Carynsulllivanscribe on November 6, 2012 at 3:18 pm

    Paul, I’m sorry that I will miss the breakfast because I would love to hear Sona speak.  My first experience with CaringBridge was in 2005, when my daughter went through a bone marrow transplant at the U of M.  The site served more than one purpose.  It enabled me to keep many people apprised of Julia’s condition in an efficient way.  It allowed them to send uplifting messages and good cheer.  As time went on, it provided a support network for other families who we met who were going through the same frightening experience, as well as connecting our respective support systems.  God bless her and her good work.



  2. Carynsulllivanscribe on November 6, 2012 at 9:18 am

    Paul, I’m sorry that I will miss the breakfast because I would love to hear Sona speak.  My first experience with CaringBridge was in 2005, when my daughter went through a bone marrow transplant at the U of M.  The site served more than one purpose.  It enabled me to keep many people apprised of Julia’s condition in an efficient way.  It allowed them to send uplifting messages and good cheer.  As time went on, it provided a support network for other families who we met who were going through the same frightening experience, as well as connecting our respective support systems.  God bless her and her good work.



  3. Carynsulllivanscribe on November 6, 2012 at 3:18 pm

    Paul, I’m sorry that I will miss the breakfast because I would love to hear Sona speak.  My first experience with CaringBridge was in 2005, when my daughter went through a bone marrow transplant at the U of M.  The site served more than one purpose.  It enabled me to keep many people apprised of Julia’s condition in an efficient way.  It allowed them to send uplifting messages and good cheer.  As time went on, it provided a support network for other families who we met who were going through the same frightening experience, as well as connecting our respective support systems.  God bless her and her good work.



  4. Carynsulllivanscribe on November 6, 2012 at 9:18 am

    Paul, I’m sorry that I will miss the breakfast because I would love to hear Sona speak.  My first experience with CaringBridge was in 2005, when my daughter went through a bone marrow transplant at the U of M.  The site served more than one purpose.  It enabled me to keep many people apprised of Julia’s condition in an efficient way.  It allowed them to send uplifting messages and good cheer.  As time went on, it provided a support network for other families who we met who were going through the same frightening experience, as well as connecting our respective support systems.  God bless her and her good work.



  5. Elizabeth Mansfield on November 6, 2012 at 3:52 pm

    Oh no!  Hilarious story but so
    glad you’re okay, Paul!  Note to self: no microwave popcorn when Paul is
    in the office!

     

    During my mother’s battle with cancer
    as well as her passing, I think CaringBridge did more for me than for anyone
    else who was reading my updates about her. It was very cathartic for me to
    write about what was going on even though I dreaded (even resented at times)
    the hopeless news I had to repeatedly report. 
    The tool was a total Godsend! It helped me tune-out the noise of
    responding to endless inquiries about her condition and allowed me to stay
    focused on being present for her.  All
    the while it helped me, unknowingly at the time, process my own grief.  After she passed I was able to return to the
    site to create a beautiful book of my posts and with all the comments from the
    amazing people who were there supporting/routing for her in her struggle – still
    a very cherished keepsake, five years later.  Anyone who has used CaringBridge can’t help
    but want to support the goodness of this organization!

     

    I have had the honor of meeting Sona
    and hearing her speak in the past and I wouldn’t miss the opportunity.  Thanks for inviting her to the GLB!

    Elizabeth Mansfield



  6. Elizabeth Mansfield on November 6, 2012 at 9:52 am

    Oh no!  Hilarious story but so
    glad you’re okay, Paul!  Note to self: no microwave popcorn when Paul is
    in the office!

     

    During my mother’s battle with cancer
    as well as her passing, I think CaringBridge did more for me than for anyone
    else who was reading my updates about her. It was very cathartic for me to
    write about what was going on even though I dreaded (even resented at times)
    the hopeless news I had to repeatedly report. 
    The tool was a total Godsend! It helped me tune-out the noise of
    responding to endless inquiries about her condition and allowed me to stay
    focused on being present for her.  All
    the while it helped me, unknowingly at the time, process my own grief.  After she passed I was able to return to the
    site to create a beautiful book of my posts and with all the comments from the
    amazing people who were there supporting/routing for her in her struggle – still
    a very cherished keepsake, five years later.  Anyone who has used CaringBridge can’t help
    but want to support the goodness of this organization!

     

    I have had the honor of meeting Sona
    and hearing her speak in the past and I wouldn’t miss the opportunity.  Thanks for inviting her to the GLB!

    Elizabeth Mansfield



  7. Elizabeth Mansfield on November 6, 2012 at 3:52 pm

    Oh no!  Hilarious story but so
    glad you’re okay, Paul!  Note to self: no microwave popcorn when Paul is
    in the office!

     

    During my mother’s battle with cancer
    as well as her passing, I think CaringBridge did more for me than for anyone
    else who was reading my updates about her. It was very cathartic for me to
    write about what was going on even though I dreaded (even resented at times)
    the hopeless news I had to repeatedly report. 
    The tool was a total Godsend! It helped me tune-out the noise of
    responding to endless inquiries about her condition and allowed me to stay
    focused on being present for her.  All
    the while it helped me, unknowingly at the time, process my own grief.  After she passed I was able to return to the
    site to create a beautiful book of my posts and with all the comments from the
    amazing people who were there supporting/routing for her in her struggle – still
    a very cherished keepsake, five years later.  Anyone who has used CaringBridge can’t help
    but want to support the goodness of this organization!

     

    I have had the honor of meeting Sona
    and hearing her speak in the past and I wouldn’t miss the opportunity.  Thanks for inviting her to the GLB!

    Elizabeth Mansfield



  8. Elizabeth Mansfield on November 6, 2012 at 9:52 am

    Oh no!  Hilarious story but so
    glad you’re okay, Paul!  Note to self: no microwave popcorn when Paul is
    in the office!

     

    During my mother’s battle with cancer
    as well as her passing, I think CaringBridge did more for me than for anyone
    else who was reading my updates about her. It was very cathartic for me to
    write about what was going on even though I dreaded (even resented at times)
    the hopeless news I had to repeatedly report. 
    The tool was a total Godsend! It helped me tune-out the noise of
    responding to endless inquiries about her condition and allowed me to stay
    focused on being present for her.  All
    the while it helped me, unknowingly at the time, process my own grief.  After she passed I was able to return to the
    site to create a beautiful book of my posts and with all the comments from the
    amazing people who were there supporting/routing for her in her struggle – still
    a very cherished keepsake, five years later.  Anyone who has used CaringBridge can’t help
    but want to support the goodness of this organization!

     

    I have had the honor of meeting Sona
    and hearing her speak in the past and I wouldn’t miss the opportunity.  Thanks for inviting her to the GLB!

    Elizabeth Mansfield



  9. Susan Marsh on November 6, 2012 at 7:27 pm

    Terry, my husband of 34 years, was diagnosed with a gliosarcoma brain tumor in July 2010.  It was terminal and we had no hope of recovery.  As word spread, a lifetime of friends and family from all over the globe wanted to know what was happening and how my husband was doing.  My daughter-in-law set me up with a Caring Bridge site and lovingly wrote the first entries.  We all journaled the process of Terry’s amazing journey from life to death to eternal life, in September 2010.  The messages of love that I received, and the ability to let everyone know what was going on was huge.
    I am so grateful for the site.  Thank you.  Susan Marsh, November 2012.



  10. Susan Marsh on November 6, 2012 at 1:27 pm

    Terry, my husband of 34 years, was diagnosed with a gliosarcoma brain tumor in July 2010.  It was terminal and we had no hope of recovery.  As word spread, a lifetime of friends and family from all over the globe wanted to know what was happening and how my husband was doing.  My daughter-in-law set me up with a Caring Bridge site and lovingly wrote the first entries.  We all journaled the process of Terry’s amazing journey from life to death to eternal life, in September 2010.  The messages of love that I received, and the ability to let everyone know what was going on was huge.
    I am so grateful for the site.  Thank you.  Susan Marsh, November 2012.



  11. Susan Marsh on November 6, 2012 at 7:27 pm

    Terry, my husband of 34 years, was diagnosed with a gliosarcoma brain tumor in July 2010.  It was terminal and we had no hope of recovery.  As word spread, a lifetime of friends and family from all over the globe wanted to know what was happening and how my husband was doing.  My daughter-in-law set me up with a Caring Bridge site and lovingly wrote the first entries.  We all journaled the process of Terry’s amazing journey from life to death to eternal life, in September 2010.  The messages of love that I received, and the ability to let everyone know what was going on was huge.
    I am so grateful for the site.  Thank you.  Susan Marsh, November 2012.



  12. Susan Marsh on November 6, 2012 at 1:27 pm

    Terry, my husband of 34 years, was diagnosed with a gliosarcoma brain tumor in July 2010.  It was terminal and we had no hope of recovery.  As word spread, a lifetime of friends and family from all over the globe wanted to know what was happening and how my husband was doing.  My daughter-in-law set me up with a Caring Bridge site and lovingly wrote the first entries.  We all journaled the process of Terry’s amazing journey from life to death to eternal life, in September 2010.  The messages of love that I received, and the ability to let everyone know what was going on was huge.
    I am so grateful for the site.  Thank you.  Susan Marsh, November 2012.



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